Ross, Herbert (1927-2000) and Nora Kaye (1920-1987)
Scope:

The Nora Kaye papers are part of the Herbert Ross and Nora Kaye collection, which also includes the papers of Kaye's husband, Herbert Hoss.  Nora Kaye's papers consist of correspondence, printed material, financial material, and other items. Her papers often overlap with Ross's, especially in projects where they worked together, such as The Turning Point.

Kaye's correspondence dates from 1947 to 1987. The letters are both personal and professional. Included are several items regarding the American Ballet Theatre (1976-1987), along with financial records, meeting minutes, and clippings; several postcards Kaye sent to her parents while she was visiting Moscow; a number of telegrams wishing her well on the beginning of the 1950 ballet season; and other items. Notable correspondents include John Martin and Dorothy Parker.

Printed material pertaining to Kaye includes posters and handbills for ballet productions, programs for her performances (1930’s-1960’s), souvenir programs, magazines, and brochures. Also present are souvenir items for Kaye's projects, dating through the 1980s.

Other items in the Kaye papers include photographs of Kaye and other dancers, as well as a drawing of a dancer inscribed to Kaye; Kaye’s "dance book" scrapbook, filled with notes and sketches; a profile of Kaye by Jennie Schulman; tributes to Kaye; obituaries; condolence notes upon her death; and film footage of Kaye dancing in a production of Giselle.

The Herbert Ross and Nora Kaye collection is extensive, covering all aspects of Ross and Kaye's lives and careers. The material consists of manuscripts, correspondence, photographs, audio, film and video recordings, memorabilia, and financial material.
Manuscripts in the collection primarily consists of material regarding films that Ross directed. Titles are listed below chronologically, along with a brief summary of the production material included. Present are:
Goodbye, Mr. Chips (1969): six screenplay drafts, correspondence (1969-1974), several hundred still photos and over 600 contact sheets;
The Owl and the Pussycat (1970): screenplay drafts, correspondence (1969-1970), twenty newspaper clippings and tearsheets with reviews and advertisements, production files re: script notes, publicity, music, credits, cast and crew lists, scene sketches (ca. 100), and several photos;
Play It Again, Sam (1972): six scripts, schedules, photocopies of English reviews, and seventeen film stills;
The Last of Sheila (1973): script drafts, production files (including budget records, schedules, screenings, casting, breakdown, music, publicity, crew, editing), production correspondence (including letters from Stephen Sondheim and Richard Benjamin), twelve stills and candid photos of Ross and cast, and a photo of a caricature of the cast by Al Hirschfeld;
Funny Lady (1975): over one dozen drafts and outlines, schedules, cast lists, continuity breakdown, thirty-nine scores (for all songs in film), post-production memos (many to and from producer Ray Stark), production correspondence, 1973-1975 (includes letters from cinematographers James Wong Howe and Vilmos Zsigmond, as well as screenwriter Jay Presson Allen), expenses, research, publicity material, and over fifty production stills;
The Sunshine Boys (1975): scripts, production files (including material regarding scripts, sets, music, locations, crew, editing, production reports, call sheets, expenses, and editing), budget records, and casting papers;
The Seven-Percent Solution (1976): script drafts, production files (including material regarding expenses, legal affairs, call sheets, and advertising), casting correspondence (with letters from Richard Chamberlain, Robert Duvall, and Orson Welles), general correspondence (with letters from Richard Attenborough, Robert Evans, Joel Grey, Nicholas Meyer, and Laurence Olivier), files regarding personnel, titles, loop lines, music, makeup, and wardrobe, several hundred printed advertisements and reviews, casting photos, ad mock-ups, and over seventy film stills;
The Goodbye Girl (1977): multiple script drafts and revisions, schedules, production files (including material regarding credits, post-production, scheduling, budget, progress reports, travel, unions, music, publicity, and camera reports), correspondence, reviews, premieres, financial material, film posters, several still photos and contact sheets from filming;
The Turning Point (1977): several dozen script drafts and revisions, production files, general correspondence (including letters from James Wong Howe, Nicholas Meyer, Sanora Babb Howe, and Arthur Laurents), sketches for camera, many reviews and articles, various printed items, letters from Mikhail Baryshnikov, contracts, production and cast memos, photographs (including publicity stills, film stills, and over 100 photos of auditioning actors and actresses), letters from Joseph E. Levine, Eva Gabor, Steven Spielberg, James Kirkwood, Dory Previn, Laurence Olivier, Joshua Logan, and others,
California Suite (1978): multiple script drafts, Ross’s production book, production stills, production sketches, printed items regarding the film, correspondence (including letters from Ray Stark, Bill Cosby, and Jane Fonda);
Chapter Two, by Neil Simon, 1977-1978 (Ross directed the Broadway production): script drafts, production files (including congratulatory letters from Norman Lear, Tom Skerritt, Ray Stark, and Tony Walton), printed material (including playbills, various reviews, and cast information);
Nijinsky (1980): several script drafts, correspondence (including letters from Harry Saltzman, Jack Valenti, Hugh Wheeler, Michael Korda, and Barry Diller), story breakdown, casting material (including letters, photos, and notes), files regarding editing, advertising, locations, legal, makeup, music, and publicity, photographs of cast, film stills, and research material;
Pennies From Heaven (1981): several different drafts of script, files regarding advertising, budget, dancers, general correspondence, legal research, music, notes, press kit, and schedules, and a transcript of a lengthy interview with Steve Martin;
I Ought to Be in Pictures (1982): posters, publicity stills, story boards (photocopies), casting and call sheets, notes, production notes, and scripts;
Max Dugan Returns (1983): film stills, drafts of script, publicity material, and storyboards for a scene;
Footloose (1984): scripts, notes and revisions, production materials, film stills, printed reviews, publicity, research, and correspondence;
Protocol (1984): scripts, revisions, and notes, production reports, notes, schedules, printed materials, and correspondence;
Dancers (1986): script versions with multiple drafts, various script notes, sections, and revisions, production notebooks, call sheets, schedules, memos regarding production and post-production, budget materials, printed material, and photographs;
The Secret of My Success (1987): scripts, revisions, and notes, production material, publicity and printed items, and correspondence;
Steel Magnolias (1989), Blue Heaven (1990), True Colors (1991), and Undercover Blues (1993): scripts, printed material: clippings, notes, storyboards, production material, and legal material; and
Boys on the Side (1995): scripts, production notes, schedules, budget items, printed material, and correspondence.
Also present in the collection is material regarding a number of rejected or abandoned film projects. These titles include Bottled Lightning (ca. 1975-1976); A Trip to India (tentative title), including a log of Ross's visit to India in 1970; Colette, including a script by Carol Sobieski; No Place to Be Somebody ; an untitled ballet film, with treatments by Gore Vidal and Clive Barnes; and a film about the Bloomsbury literary circle. Other film-related items include copies of Paddy Chayevsky's script for the film Altered States ; scripts, letters and notes regarding Gore Vidal's Dress Gray ; scripts, letters and notes regarding The Thorn Birds (including letters from Susan George, Robert Redford, and Christopher Reeve); scripts, letters and notes regarding Carrington; and other miscellaneous items.
Another project represented in the papers is Ross's production of La Boheme, produced in Los Angeles in 1993. Included is production material, correspondence financial material, sketches, photographs, and the libretto.
Correspondence in the collection dates from ca. 1968 through the 1990s, and cover various personal and professional topics. Subjects include the American Ballet Theatre School, the Carter Administration, the Director's Guild, Hera Productions (Ross's company), script submissions, choreography, invitations, Ross's wedding to Lee Radziwill (sister of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis), and other topics. Numerous letters are present from various actors and actresses who appeared in Ross's films, as well as letters from directors, dancers, producers, and others in the film industry. Notable correspondents include Eddie Albert, Milton Berle, Leslie Bricusse, Gregory Peck, Joel Grey, Shirley MacLaine, James Mason, Agnes DeMille, Jerome Robbins, Nelson Riddle, Jennifer Jones, Gore Vidal, Arnold L. Weissberger, Robert Wise, John Williams, Richard Attenborough, Mel Ferrer, Lauren Bacall, and Michael J. Fox
Printed material in the collection includes several articles, reviews, interviews, profiles and similar material regarding Ross's films, dance performances, theatrical productions. Also present are several items regarding individuals who collaborated with Ross, such Neil Simon, as well as items regarding potential stage or screen projects for Ross to direct or produce. Numerous programs, invitations, and advertisements are also present.
Hundreds of photographs are included in the collection, primarily stills from Ross's films and photos used for cast selection. Personal photos include a number of portraits of Ross and Nora Kaye, as well as snapshots taken at home and while traveling. There are also some photographs of Ross and Lee Radziwill present.
The collection contains a large number of audio and video recordings on a variety of cassettes, films, and video cassettes. These items include music used for scenes in Ross’s films and stage productions; music for a ballet; videotapes of filims directed by Ross; videotapes (VHS and U-Matic formats) containing television advertisements (often multiple versions), various scenes, and theatrical previews; film reels, including voice outtakes for The Seven-Per-Cent Solution, composite pictures for the India project, an episode of The Fred Astaire Show which Ross choreographed, recordings of television shows about Ross' productions, and recordings of performances and shows that were aired on television.
Awards and other memorabilia are also in the collection. Present are statues, plaques, certificates, and other items presented to Ross for various accomplishments in the fields of dance and film. These include Golden Globe Awards, Director’s Guild Awards, Academy Award nominations, and various dance and music awards.
Financial material in the collection is extensive. The items pertain to Ross and Kaye’s personal and professional affairs, as well as Ross’s financial and legal interests after his marriage to Lee Radziwill. Included are business records, royalty statements, contracts, bank statements, financial ledgers, and other items, dating from 1969 through the 1990s.
The Nora Kaye papers consist of correspondence, printed material, financial material, and other items. Her papers often overlap with Ross's, especially in projects where they worked together, such as The Turning Point.
Kaye's correspondence dates from 1947 to 1987. The letters are both personal and professional. Included are several items regarding the American Ballet Theatre (1976-1987), along with financial records, meeting minutes, and clippings; several postcards Kaye sent to her parents while she was visiting Moscow; a number of telegrams wishing her well on the beginning of the 1950 ballet season; and other items. Notable correspondents include John Martin and Dorothy Parker.
Printed material pertaining to Kaye includes posters and handbills for ballet productions, programs for her performances (1930’s-1960’s), souvenir programs, magazines, and brochures. Also present are souvenir items for Kaye's projects, dating through the 1980s.
Other items in the Kaye papers include photographs of Kaye and other dancers, as well as a drawing of a dancer inscribed to Kaye; Kaye’s "dance book" scrapbook, filled with notes and sketches; a profile of Kaye by Jennie Schulman; tributes to Kaye; obituaries; condolence notes upon her death; and film footage of Kaye dancing in a production of Giselle .

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Notable Figures
1. Kaye, Nora, 1920-1987
2. Ross, Herbert, 1927-2001
Associated Subjects
1. Women's Studies Collections -- Music and Dance Subject Guide
2. Theatre and Film Subject Guide
3. Dance Subject Guide
4. Helen Deutsch Research Section
5. Ballet dancers
6. Ballet -- United States
7. Ballet -- Production and direction -- United States
8. Ballet companies -- United States -- New York (State) -- New York
9. Theater -- United States -- New York (State) -- New York
10. Ballet in motion pictures, television, etc.
11. Ballet Theatre (New York, N.Y.)
12. Motion pictures – United States
13. Choreographers
14. Scripts
15. Ballerinas
16. Television -- Production and direction -- United States
17. Photographs
18. Motion pictures